Destination: The Winx Saga review: Season 2 fails to find its identity

The second season of Destination: The Winx Saga, which starting today you can watch on Netflix, begins where the first one ended. Five teenage fairies, with potentially catastrophic magical abilities, must learn to control their powers. In the first season, the series focused, in its six episodes, on showing that magic is a mystery related to the past. In the new installment, power is everything: the good, the bad, love, the unattainable…. This changes the tone of the plot. In addition to bringing it much closer to the original animated series. Winx Clubby Iginio Straffi.

At Alfea, the magical boarding school in Another World, things have changed very little. Not enough, at least, for Bloom (Abigail Cowen) and the rest of her classmates to fully understand the meaning of its internal dynamics. Did the high school become a silent enemy after the events of last season’s finale? Once it was revealed that old secrets never die, and all are at risk, returning to the walls of the venerable institution seems like a risk.

Nevertheless, Destination: The Winx Saga makes it clear from its first episodes that for the magical creatures of the Otherworld it is impossible not to.

Where to go when you’re capable of blasting everything around you with fire in a burst of pain? Who could understand you in case you could hear the thoughts and pains of others with minimal effort? The eventuality of magic-how it works, what it provokes and what it transforms-is much more pronounced this time around than in the previous season. So much so that the preponderant element is no longer the perception of this school of magical teenagers, but what lies behind its premise.

What happens to Sky, Riven, Musa, Beatrix and even the perfidious Stella in a scenario in which. their adolescent rivalry takes on a new twist? The second season reinforces the idea through a complicated transition to a somewhat hurried maturity. That, however, ends up being necessary to understand the deeper meaning of how the story approaches the mystery.

Fate: The Winx Saga

Fate: The Winx Saga

The first season of the series received all kinds of criticism for turning Alfea into a somewhat unfortunate replica of the iconic Hogwarts. The new episodes, in fact, are focused on marking differences and achieving a new personality for the production. It achieves this by defining its place as an enclave in the middle of two worlds. If reality is on the edge of the Other World, Alfea’s students are travelers between two perceptions of the mystical. Especially Bloom, whose split nature becomes more complicated as his powers increase. So do suspicions about his ability to control them.

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A second season with magic turned real enemy

The new episodes of Destination: The Winx Saga begin by exploring what the essential changes are at Alfea once Rosalind takes over control of the institute. Although it is not a subject that is immediately touched upon. The first scenes take place, in fact, in the bucolic peace that surrounds the venerable institution. Terra (Eliot Salt), perhaps the most innocent and fragile of the original group of fairies, wanders the forest in search of a connection with nature.

The narrative moves forward nicely toward the questions left open in the partial closure of the first installment of the story. Who are we when our identity depends on what we can do? Terra, more than any other, must deal with the strange weight of being an exception, even among the unusual. An idea she shares with Bloom, and now with Flora (Paulina Chávez), in the midst of an increasingly complicated and sinister environment.

Alfea, turned into an enclave where magic is put to the test, provokes its characters to ask painful questions about themselves. A complicated point when it links in a completely different way with the perception of the extraordinary. Every student is a risk, a danger and an opportunity. Also, a hope and a promise. But what happens when everything becomes a convoluted and strange space, increasingly dangerous?
'Fate: The Winx Saga'.

Destination: The Winx Saga in search of identity

The first season of the series received all kinds of criticism for turning Alfea into a somewhat unfortunate replica of the iconic Hogwarts.The new episodes, in fact, are focused on to make a difference and achieve a new personality for the production. It achieves this by defining its role as an enclave in the middle of two worlds. If reality is on the edge of the Otherworld, Alfea’s students are travelers between two perceptions of the mystical. Especially Bloom, whose split nature becomes more complicated as his powers increase. Also, suspicions about his ability to control them.

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Actually, the big point of the second season is delineating with a good pulse the world of the fairies. Gradually, it becomes more evident that the quality of the magical is part of an underexplored emotional place. Bloom, who during the first season tried to link fear, mourning, and the frightening with a destructive power, must find a point of balance. The new quarter finds her terrified, with the gates of Alfea closing behind her and confining her to a terrifying space. However, the character is strong enough to assume that, this time, she is not the frightened child who arrived almost casually at an inexplicable school.

The change makes the show explore much more adult regions. Which also benefits the characters of Stella, Aisha, Terra and Musa. The novelty of the new episodes of Destination: The Winx Saga also includes Flora, the version live action of one of the most beloved figures in comics. This is an addition to be welcomed, as it supports and links the history of the streaming with its long heritage in pop culture. The result is a new vision of Alfea – made into a more gloomy place, with more personality and more elitist and its students.
'Fate: The Winx Saga',

Destination: The Winx Saga a fantasy full of elegance

In the new season, the series tries to handle the darkness inherent in the fact that each of its characters is a danger. A latent one and, moreover, with a past to deal with. It’s no longer about a display of extraordinary abilities, but how they are sustained through a broad idea. Bloom who has become the unwitting leader of the school, tries to understand in her early chapters why the fire in her blood is also a stigma.

The new season of Destination: The Winx Saga Is a less sinister and more juvenile version of. Locke and Key. Probably, also a revision to the major concepts of Sabrina, the teenage witch. With a finale that promises a return unconfirmed, the series improved in the essentials, but remains a slightly generic product. One without major power to create its own universe in the midst of dozens of similar ones around it.