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Colorado law easy on rogue officers

Colorado law is lenient when it comes to discipline of police officers. Unless they are convicted of a felony or one of 44 misdemeanors detailed in statute as cause to end an officer's career, an officer can remain in law enforcement despite past offenses that forced him or her out of a previous job. The Denver Post found some striking examples of police who were rehired by other units with little reprimand, such as an officer who allegedly had sex with a prostitute in a squad car and another who was twice arrested for domestic violence. “In Colorado, a police officer can be fired or resign for egregious violations of moral turpitude… But so long as there is no conviction of a felony or one of the misdemeanors, the officer is free to seek employment at another agency.”
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Connecticut nurse pleads guilty to drug kickback charges

An advanced practice registered nurse identified in recent Connecticut Health i–Team  stories as the state’s highest Medicare program prescriber of  potent narcotics – writing $2.7 million in prescriptions - has admitted to taking kickbacks from a pharmaceutical company and claiming more than $1 million in Medicare claims. Heather Alfonso, 42, of Middlebury, Conn. pleaded guilty June 23 to federal charges she received $83,000 in kickbacks from January 2013 to March 2015  from an unnamed drug company for prescribing the company’s drug for cancer pain. “The U.S. attorney’s investigation revealed that the manufacturer of the drug paid Alfonso as a speaker for more than 70 ‘dinner programs,’ at a rate of approximately $1,000 per event. In many instances, the dinner programs were only attended by Alfonso and a sales representative for the drug manufacturer,’ [federal prosecutors said].”
Read the full story here.

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Amphetamines prescribed to treat binge eating disorder

Amphetamines were once used as diet pills. But in the 1970s, production and use of them dropped after the FDA deemed them only appropriate for narcolepsy and ADHD (then called hyperkinetic disorder of childhood) and prohibited doctors from selling them as weight loss drugs. However, Mother Jones reveals amphetamines are now being prescribed to individuals with binge eating disorder. “Amphetamine products were categorized as federally controlled substances with strict regulation of when and how they could be prescribed. The FDA prohibited doctors from selling the drugs for weight loss; the only approved usages were narcolepsy and ‘hyperkinetic disorder of childhood’—today's ADHD.”
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‘White nationalist’ group that inspired alleged Charleston shooter enjoys tax exemption

 The Council of Conservative Citizens, which promotes white primacy, allegedly inspired Dylann Roof, the man charged with nine counts of murder in the shootings at the South’s oldest black church in Charleston, S.C.  However, the Council is listed as a 501 (c)(4) by the IRS, indicating that it is considered a “nonprofit organization that promotes social welfare” and thus is tax exempt. “The Council of Conservative Citizens explains on its website that its members believe ‘that the American people and government should remain European in their composition and character…. We also oppose all efforts to mix the races of mankind.’ ”
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Unaccredited schools of sexuality, religion, and massage paid for by the GI Bill

The U.S. Department of Education has a set of minimum standards that must be met by most schools before receiving federal funds. However, Reveal News found that some schools do not have to meet such standards under a GI Bill loophole initially implemented to let veterans attend trade schools. Taxpayers have spent over $260 million on these unaccredited institutions. “Reveal has found a gold rush of 2,000 schools cashing in on the exemption. The list includes schools set up to make a profit by teaching blackjack, scuba diving, dog grooming, taxidermy and yoga. Many are owned by individuals who’ve gone bankrupt… A handful are owned by convicted felons.”
Read the full story here.