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VIDEO: How much should you know about genetic testing?

NECIR's investigation into the industry of personalized psychiatric medicine prompted an important conversation about the benefits and limits of genetic testing. How much do these tests really tell us? Is there harm in knowing too much when we don't yet know how to interpret the findings?

John Brown

More harm than good? Use of genetic mental health tests has grown rapidly. But evidence they work is scant. (+documentation)

Genetic tests to identify the most effective psychiatry drugs are the hot new thing in the race to better treat conditions ranging from depression to attention deficit disorder to anxiety. But a review by NECIR has found that virtually all the evidence that these psychiatric tests work is based on limited studies funded by the companies themselves. And unlike drugs, they are not regulated by the FDA.

John Brown

More harm than good? Use of genetic mental health tests has grown rapidly. But evidence they work is scant.

Genetic tests to identify the most effective psychiatry drugs are the hot new thing in the race to better treat conditions ranging from depression to attention deficit disorder to anxiety. But a review by NECIR has found that virtually all the evidence that these psychiatric tests work is based on limited studies funded by the companies themselves. And unlike drugs, they are not regulated by the FDA.

With a half-finished green house, licensed medical marijuana patient and caregiver Devin Noonan grows a total of 72 cannabis plants in Augusta, Maine.

Rarely inspected, medical marijuana caregivers could feed illegal markets

In an environment of conflicting medical marijuana laws across the country, caregivers operate almost entirely without government oversight, according to a News21 analysis of laws in the 23 states. State regulators acknowledge that this lack of oversight could and does encourage the illegal sale of marijuana by caregivers to people who may or may not hold a medical marijuana card.